The best hotels for budget city breaks in the UK

Advice

The UK is one of the easiest places to explore when money is a little tight. We’ve got glorious free-for-all galleries in the likes of London and Edinburgh, while cities such as York and Bath are like living museums of the past, with cobbled streets and historic buildings free to see on a stroll around the city centre. Head to Manchester to mooch around myriad free attractions, including the compelling Science & Industry Museum and the Pankhurst Centre, or take a self-guided street art tour of the colourful Northern Quarter before enjoying the free live music in one of its many city-centre pubs.

You could spend an entire weekend in many of Britain’s cities and not pay for a thing beyond dinner, drinks and a good hotel room (see also our page on the best city breaks UK to suit all wallet sizes) – and cutting the cost doesn’t have to mean tiny bedrooms, terrible service and underwhelming breakfast buffets, either. We’re a nation of money-savvy travellers and so these days there are plenty of boutique hotels and b&bs across the country offering personal service and style, often for well under £150. Here, our experts have picked out the best pocket-friendly hotels for budget city breaks in the UK.

Bath

Hotel accommodation in Bath is pricey compared to many other UK cities. You can cut costs by as much as half by visiting out of season (say in January or February) and avoiding Friday and Saturday nights throughout the year. Parking is costly too: come by train, or book a hotel with parking included. Otherwise, Bath is not an expensive city to visit. Many key sights – the Royal Crescent, Bath Abbey, the Assembly Rooms – are free, as is the council’s undervisited Victoria Art Gallery. And with Bath compact enough to get around pretty much everywhere on foot, you may not end paying for any transport. Note that tickets to the Roman Baths (pictured below) and Thermae Bath Spa are cheaper on weekdays than weekends. See more on Bath in our guide to the city, and hotels below. 

By Fred Mawer



Budget hotels Bath


Many key sights like Bath Abbey (pictured) are free, though tickets to see the Roman Baths (also pictured) are cheaper on weekdays


Credit: © Joe Daniel Price/joe daniel price

Where to stay in Bath

    

Brooks Guesthouse Bath

Bath, Somerset, England

7
Telegraph expert rating

This sizeable b&b occupies a pair of Victorian houses close to Royal Victoria Park and The Royal Crescent, with the city centre in easy walking distance. As for which room to choose, the b&b faces a busy road so you may want to ask for a bedroom at the rear. Cheapest rooms – Compact Doubles – are definitively small, with cramped bathrooms; larger Standard Doubles cost just a few pounds more. A long-stay car park is close by, and the b&b supplies parking permits (£10 per night).


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98

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Z Bath

Bath, Somerset, England

7
Telegraph expert rating

A hip and more upmarket alternative to the city’s existing low-cost brands. With a pared-back and minimalist atmosphere, it sets out to attract a younger crowd and is very suited to a short stay (one to three nights). Rooms, though small by usual standards, offer clean, minimalist lines and comfort; the white walls are offset by occasional oak-veneered panelling and large, dark grey headboards; the very comfortable beds are made in Devon. Smallest are the Z Inside Double rooms (no window).


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45

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YHA Bath

Bath, Somerset, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

Bath’s outpost of the YHA is set within its own wooded grounds a 20-minute stroll from the city centre. Expect an Italianate building with decorative Victorian tiles, parquet floors and ornate ceiling roses juxtaposed with the YHA’s bright green branding. There is a relaxed café and bar; a simple but satisfactory restaurant where children eat free; and a vast and well-stocked self-catering kitchen where families can cook and eat their own meals (saving themselves a fleecing in the city centre). Though nowhere to park your car, there is free parking on the road.


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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Bath


Belfast

Once a tourism black hole, Belfast is now a vibrant city with glorious Victorian architecture, a great live music scene – the cobbled streets of the Cathedral Quarter have been revived as the buzzing heart of the city’s nightlife – and some fun foodie haunts. 

Cheap eats of note include The Dirty Onion (thedirtyonion.com) in Hill Street for lip-smacking free-range rotisserie chicken and spicy ribs, while the popular Yardbird bar downstairs has an eclectic range of live music seven nights a week. Top an afternoon off with a whiskey at The Friend at Hand in Hill Street (dukeofyorkbelfast.com), which sells miniatures at £5, and head upstairs to see their fascinating free museum on the history of Belfast distilling. Another great browsing spot is St George’s Market, built in the 1890s. Open Fridays to Sundays, it has 200 market stalls selling food, arts and crafts to the accompaniment of live music.

If it’s your first time in the city, the hop-on, hop-off open top bus tour is a great way to get your bearings (an adult one-day ticket is £15; citytoursbelfast.com), and Belfast is compact enough to see all the best bits in a weekend. Or, for a long weekend, add the scenic north coast, Game of Thrones locations and Giant’s Causeway. See more on Belfast in our guide to the city, and hotels below. 

By Geoff Hill



Budget hotels Belfast


The Cathedral Quarter has become the buzzing heart of the city’s nightlife


Credit: Arpad Benedek 2021; Twilightcolors.com; All rights reserved./benedek

Where to stay in Belfast

    

Jurys Inn Belfast

Belfast, Northern Ireland

7
Telegraph expert rating

The Jurys Inn Belfast is in a great city-centre location, right next door to the Grand Opera House. Interiors have been completely renovated, prices are good (especially for families) and it has a brilliant website on what to do and see in the area. The only facilities of note are a business working zone on the ground floor and a mini-kiosk selling refreshments. A nice touch is a handy taxi button on the reception desk. Press it, and a cab appears as if by magic. Even better, the hop-on, hop-off city tour buses leave from outside the front door.


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Tara Lodge

Belfast, Northern Ireland

8
Telegraph expert rating

This lovely boutique hotel has for years been ranked as one of the top hotels in Belfast, and it’s easy to see why, with a handy location, friendly and helpful staff, scrumptious breakfasts, free Wi-Fi, off-street parking, comfortable rooms and stylish details throughout – all for great value. The look inside is exquisitely stylish, with simple yet comfortable rooms, funky lights, giant transparent clocks and original artwork or well-chosen prints on the walls. A residents’ lounge has an open fire, television and a good range of guide books.


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Malone Lodge Hotel

Belfast, Northern Ireland

7
Telegraph expert rating

This comfy hotel in a pleasant and leafy location (and just a short bus ride from the city centre) is located within walking distance of Queen’s University, the Botanic Gardens and the chic shops of the Lisburn Road. Slick and contemporary interiors have been saved from sterility by a squadron of deep leather sofas and armchairs near the small ground-floor bar. There’s a private car park and 24-hour room service, but no spa, gym or pool. It is however popular with weddings, and very family-friendly.


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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Belfast


Birmingham

From Gas Street Basin’s waterside bistros to Edgbaston’s quiet tree-lined towpaths, Birmingham’s meandering canals have often been the highlight of a trip to the Second City. But with groundbreaking restaurants like Aktar Islam’s Opheem, curious heritage sites like the Birmingham Back-to-Backs and ornate arcades hosting myriad independent traders, Birmingham’s famous canals are just one of many reasons to visit. Spend time wandering amid the historic streets and laid-back bistros of the Jewellery Quarter or jump on a train to craft beer nirvana in Stirchley. Or just enjoy a rapidly evolving city centre that offers some of the UK’s best theatre, shopping and dining experiences. Here’s our guide to Birmingham, plus pick of the best places to stay.

By James March



Birmingham city breaks


Birmingham’s meandering canals are a highlight of a trip to the Second City


Credit: Bill Allsopp/Loop Images

Where to stay in Birmingham

    

Bloc Hotel Birmingham

Birmingham, England

7
Telegraph expert rating

Compact, quirky and convenient – Bloc is one of the city’s best value hotel options. As the name suggests, the pod-style rooms are in block formation along well-lit corridors. The (windowless) entry-level rooms are functional but have comfortable pocket-sprung king beds and wet rooms with monsoon showers. Overall it’s all about service rather than the facilities, which are stripped back, though room service is unnecessary when there are so many good eating options on the doorstep; if you are in this part of the city, you don’t want to be confined to barracks.


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Hampton by Hilton Birmingham Broad Street

Birmingham, England

7
Telegraph expert rating

Hampton by Hilton is also one of Birmingham’s best affordable options, set up above the bustle of Broad Street in a refurbished office block. The building’s exterior may be a slab of 1960s concrete, but inside the ambiance is bright and colourful with stained-wood flooring, groovy carpets, recessed spotlights, lamps, plants and local photography. For a budget hotel, there is everything you need: a large, communal sitting area for catching up with friends; luggage hold; laundry service; a good-sized (and quiet) business centre; and a compact fitness room.


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Saint Pauls House

Birmingham, England

7
Telegraph expert rating

Saint Pauls, a former rope factory, is a fine example of Birmingham’s new generation of small, boutique hotels – and just five minutes’ stroll from the city’s buzzy Colmore Business District. The hotel’s Georgian frontage hides a spacious interior where hipster Shoreditch collides with cool millennial Brum. There are nice design nods to the past, and rooms are compact but well set out, with rain showers in bathrooms, good bedding, plenty of pillows, Dualit coffee machines and complimentary refreshments.


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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Birmingham


Bristol

Celebrated for its creativity and diversity, Bristol’s cachet and popularity have recently been further increased with its role as the location for numerous television series, among them Showtrial, The Outlaws, and Wolf Hall (see the Wolf Hall Trail at Bristol Cathedral here). From cutting-edge music and street art to its outstanding food scene, innovative museums and dockside attractions, Bristol delivers – there’s even an inland surfing venue at The Wave. Hop on a boat round the harbour, explore vibrant districts such as Bedminster and Southville, seek out a speakeasy-style bar (The Milk Thistle; milkthistlebristol.com), tour the hidden vaults of Clifton Suspension Bridge, or check on those set locations. Plan ahead and the city won’t disappoint – though you’ll find you’ll want more than a weekend. See our full guide to the city here, plus pick of hotels below.

By Simon Horsford



Bristol Catherdral


Some of Wolf Hall’s major scenes were filmed at Bristol Cathedral


Credit: Jon Reid of nomadicvision.com/John and Tina Reid

Where to stay in Bristol

    

Brooks Guesthouse Bristol

Bristol, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

More b&b than hotel, Brooks Guesthouse is part of a micro chain. This one has a young urban vibe – appropriate as its previous life was a backpacker’s hostel – with simple unfussy rooms and some quirky features (street art in the courtyard, caravans on the roof and doggy flock wallpaper in the downstairs loo). On a narrow walkway between Baldwin Street and Corn Street, it’s in a corner of Bristol’s Old City where street markets rub shoulders with historic churches, jazz pubs and restaurants housed in converted Georgian banks.


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Avon Gorge by Hotel du Vin

Bristol, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

The Grade II-listed building of this Hotel du Vin outpost dates from 1898 when this grand Victorian building, with its slightly faded cream-white plaster and distinctive wrought-iron canopy above the entrance, was known as the Grand Clifton Spa and Hydropathic Institution (taking the waters from the hot springs below Clifton was a popular pastime). The makeover has transformed the hotel and made even more use of its enviable position. Rooms are spacious, with lovely white-tiled bathrooms, super comfy beds, a Nespresso machine and treats in a basket.


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114

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9 Prince’s Buildings

Bristol, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

This cosy, old-fashioned and very British b&b is located in a classic townhouse in the genteel suburb of Clifton. With its Georgian features and antique furniture, the house feels full of heritage: sash windows let in the light, oil paintings and watercolours adorn the walls, and sofas, table lamps, armchairs and objets d’art seem to fill every corner. There’s a lovely lawned garden, and cracking views over the Avon Gorge and the Downs. Rooms come in various sizes and several of the bathrooms are rather grand, with stately china sinks and clawfoot bath-tubs.


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69

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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Bristol


Cardiff

Cardiff numbers among the planet’s most recently appointed capitals, assuming the role in 1955, and has striven to appeal to all comers ever since. It mixes dignified 19th-century and daring contemporary architecture, boasts a booming music scene, flaunts fantastic museums like the world-class, free-of-charge National Museum and St Fagans Natural History Museum and has transformed its seaside with one of Europe’s boldest waterfront developments, Cardiff Bay.

The city understands when to trumpet its history and its coal-exporting Victorian heyday that fuelled the flamboyant decoration of its castle, the making of its dashing market and its atmospheric shopping arcades. And it knows when to showcase the new, as strolling round architectural showcase Cardiff Bay will confirm. Continue the walk out to impressive Cardiff Bay Barrage, poised between harbour and ocean, from where the city skyline is one of Britain’s most distinguished. Discover more in our guide to the city, and pick of the best hotels below.

By Luke Waterford



Cardiff, budget city breaks


The city has transformed its seaside with one of Europe’s boldest waterfront developments, Cardiff Bay


Credit: © Phil Bird www.philbirdphotography.com/Phil Bird

Where to stay in Cardiff

    

Mercure Cardiff Holland House Hotel and Spa

Cardiff, Wales

7
Telegraph expert rating

Mercure Holland House stands tall on the main Newport Road artery into the city. Head right from the hotel for City Road and Roath, a diverse area popular with students and home to some of the city’s coolest spots for casual dining and cocktails. The look is modern, with bronzed plant pots and pendant lamps above light blue wingback chairs, with nods to Welsh industrial heritage through slate, wood, metal and glass textures. There’s a spa with a pool, sauna, steam room and whirlpool tub, plus a gym.


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66

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Hotel One Hundred

Cardiff, Wales

8
Telegraph expert rating

House number 100 on Cardiff’s busy Newport Road, Hotel One Hundred is a well-loved Edwardian terraced house turned into one of the city’s very few boutique-style b&bs. Other than a lounge with a television and a DVD library, there are no additional facilities – understandable in an uncomplicated property such as this. The seven rooms all share similar traits (mirrors framed in ornate styles, long wooden headboards, elegant patterned wallpaper on feature walls) but are dressed in varying colours and patterns. It represents superb value for money.


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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Cardiff


Edinburgh

Edinburgh is an ‘iconic’ city, but icons seldom come cheap. Happily, for every luxury hotel there’s an affordable alternative nearby, but costing £50-£90 a night. And if you have Michelin stars in your eyes but not your budget, consider Pitt Market, Leith’s ‘you tasted it here first’ street food venue. Find information about events (many free), on whatsoninedinburgh.co.uk, and swap pricey City Tour buses for cheaper alternatives (Lothian Buses day ticket costs less than half). Just remember to leave your umbrella at home (it’s a windy city) unless you’re channelling Mary Poppins. For a rooftop tour, try St Giles Cathedral instead (£6). Here’s our full guide to the city, plus top picks below.

By Linda Macdonald



Edinburgh city budget breaks


For every luxury hotel in Edinburgh there’s an affordable alternative nearby


Credit: George Clerk/georgeclerk

Where to stay in Edinburgh

    

Aparthotel Adagio Edinburgh Royal Mile

Edinburgh, Scotland

8
Telegraph expert rating

This well-designed hybrid is a winning alternative to budget hotels. You get a fitness room, continental breakfast and an appealing reception/lounge area with your snappy self-catering mini-apartment on the Canongate, the up-and-coming Old Town end of the Royal Mile. The vast lobby/lounge/breakfast area is ideal for reading (books and games provided) or socialising, and a big enclosed courtyard for sheltered sun-basking. You’ll find drinks, snacks and microwave meals next to reception and there’s a self-service laundry.


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B+B Edinburgh

Edinburgh, Scotland

8
Telegraph expert rating

Expect decent-value rooms and even better breakfasts (mostly organic) in an extraordinary home built by a Victorian press baron. Affordable rooms with aspirations to be boutique do feel at odds with the Victorian mansion’s grandeur, but many of the property’s most distinctive features have survived (a grand staircase, ornate fireplaces, marble floors, leaded windows). There is a bar and you can grab a cup of complimentary coffee and a biscuit in reception before you borrow a bike to head out. Or retreat to the library where you can literally lose yourself in the books.


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The Grassmarket Hotel

Edinburgh, Scotland

7
Telegraph expert rating

Situated at the foot of Edinburgh Castle just off the Royal Mile, there isn’t a more central or livelier location than this. Rooms range from Cosy (single, tiny) and Snug (double or twin and still small), to Comfy (double or twin and nicely roomy) and Comfy Plus (sleeping three or four). The décor is bang up-to-hipster date, with cabin trunk wardrobes, Dandy comic book wallpaper and magnetic wall maps of the city to plan your sightseeing. Comfort hasn’t been overlooked either, with good quality bed linen and rainfall showers.


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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Edinburgh


Liverpool

Liverpool is booming as a city-break destination and there are plenty of cheaper hotel options – typically under £80 per night. But book ahead. Weekends are busy with football home games and live events, from the M&S Bank Arena to the Liverpool Philharmonic. The three hotels below are all handy for the city’s two landmark cathedrals, which are both free to visit (although the tower tour is paid), and The Old Dock Tour, a free tour of the docklands run by National Museums Liverpool (whose museums are also free to visit; visitLiverpool.com).

By David Atkinson



Budget hotels in Liverpool


Book a free tour of the docklands run by National Museums Liverpool


Credit: Alexander Spatari/Alexander Spatari

Where to stay in Liverpool

    

The Resident Liverpool

Liverpool, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

This Liverpool hotel is a good option for anyone seeking quality, city-centre accommodation on a reasonably modest budget. While it doesn’t have the facilities of some of its high-end competitors, it doesn’t carry their hefty price tags either. Location speaks for itself: the brick-fronted hotel, once a print works, is situated among cafés, late-night bars and clubs in Ropewalks, an area of town that is lively, characterful and rough around the edges in equal measure. Many city attractions, including the Albert Dock, are within easy walking distance.


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Z Liverpool

Liverpool, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

A contemporary budget option in Liverpool city centre, about an eight-minute walk from Liverpool’s historic Unesco-listed Waterfront. A colourful café-bar doubles as the reception where an all-day menu of light dishes is served, and there’s a big-screen television and free newspapers. No on-site parking but guests get a discount at a nearby car park. Décor is clean-lined and minimalistic in the rooms, beds are bespoke, and there’s a drinks tray plus free bottled water and complimentary Wi-Fi. Cheapest are super-budget Inside Doubles.


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Epic Apart Hotel – Duke Street

Liverpool, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

Duke Street is a modern conversion of a former printing office at the heart of Liverpool’s vibrant nightlife district. Its self-catering Epic Apart Hotel offers a home-from-home stay with well thought out features and feels private and secure for solo travellers. Everything, including fully equipped kitchens (not in the ePODs which are like Yotel-style studios), is to hand. Expect a corporate crowd mid-week, when you can bag good-value deals, and a more mixed crowd at weekends.


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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Liverpool


London

London has so much to offer for all budgets, and there’s plenty to do if you’re visiting on a shoestring – or just want more bang for your buck. The range of affordable restaurants, pubs, pop-ups, performance art and large-scale festivals is astounding, and there are hundreds of free museums, tours, galleries and events to lose yourself in. Even entry to the bigger attractions like the Tower of London, London Eye and Sealife Centre can be discounted up to 40 per cent with the London Explorer Pass (gocity.com). There are wonderful parks dotted throughout the city and markets galore – especially in East London, the land of the hip and happening. It’s a great place to wander and take in the atmosphere and characters, especially because it’s easy to get from one place to the next.

If you’re planning a trip with smaller pockets, you can find amazing accommodation for under £150 per night in the city. Granted, it might not have a Mayfair location or the butler service of the Ritz, but our recommendations will always offer affordable prices without sacrificing quality. See our full guide to London here, and budget hotel picks below.

By Alison Taylor



Columbia Road Flower Market, London


There are wonderful parks dotted throughout London and markets galore (pictured: Columbia Road Flower Market)


Credit: elenachaykina/elenachaykina

Where to stay in London

    

Assembly London

Leicester Square, London, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

Word is out on this West End budget beauty. Its simple but comfortable rooms, stellar location right next to Leicester Square, design inspired by some of the greatest British fashion icons, and access to a fabulous orangery-style rooftop restaurant will be a winner for city-hopping millennials. Rooms (Snug, Nest, Pad, Den) are uniform greyscale with geometric carpeting, headboards with leather buckles and dog tooth-style cushions.


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91

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Mama Shelter London

Bethnal Green, London, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

Come here for the fun, affordable, comfortable retro-style bedrooms – and stay for the cocktails and karaoke. Maximalist to the core, with a touch of the 1970s, interiors won’t be to everyone’s taste, but it’s a breath of fresh air from the basic budget beige favoured by many similarly priced mini-chains. There’s table football, a giant built-in Twister board, and retro video games. The best bit? The two, sound-proofed, Japanese-style karaoke rooms. The neighbourhood, too, has plenty to offer.


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89

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citizenM London Bankside

South Bank, London, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

Close to the River Thames in the heart of London’s buzzy Bankside district, citizenM Bankside is within walking distance of Borough Market, the Tate Modern and Millennium Bridge. The hotel seems to have sussed out what 21st-century travellers want, successfully bridging the gap between basic and luxury chic proving that style is possible on a shoestring. The 192 rooms are clean, comfortable and practical, while the pod-style bathrooms are small but have powerful rain showers. Food is available 24/7 through CanteenM in the middle of the lounge.


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Manchester

On a city break in Manchester, you won’t have to spend a fortune to have a good time. There are daily free walking tours of the city centre, many of its top attractions, such as art galleries, libraries and museums are free to enter, and there’s street art to admire in the creative Northern Quarter. Plus, the city centre is extremely walkable and there are free bus services from Piccadilly station (tfgm.com) if you have luggage.

Manchester’s hotel scene is currently thriving, too, with almost 1,200 new rooms having been added to the city centre in the first two months of 2022 alone. This means that there are more bedrooms in self-catering aparthotels, budget boutique hotels and design-led chains to choose between than ever. To find the best hotel prices, avoid visiting when there’s a big football match or event such as Parklife on. A full guide to the city can be found here, plus hotel picks below.

By Cathy Toogood



Manchester, budget uk city breaks


You won’t have to spend a fortune to have a good time in Manchester


Credit: trabantos

Where to stay in Manchester

    

YOTEL Manchester Deansgate

Manchester, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

YOTELs show that affordable doesn’t need to mean bland. In a former 1960s office block on central Deansgate, its funky bar and restaurant attracts locals as well as guests and its sustainable focus means that toiletries are natural, bedding is made from recycled plastic bottles and green choices are rewarded. Bright fabrics, pink neon-lit quotes and statement wallpaper from local design house BOBO1325 combine to make a bold first impression, and there’s a Manchester theme running through the modern décor in its reception, restaurant and bar.


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63

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Whitworth Locke

Manchester, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

This achingly cool aparthotel, spread over three former export mills on busy Princess Street, has all you need for a stay in the city – and more. As well as stylish studios and suites, there’s a co-working space, coffee shop, pop-up cocktail bar, a gym perfect for yoga, and a regular rota of events. New York-based architects and designers, Grzywinski+Pons, have embraced the cotton mills’ original features, such as exposed bricks and pillars, and have softened them with pastel paints, an energetic jungle theme in the co-working space, and pops of yellow in the bar.


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Motel One Manchester-Piccadilly

Manchester, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

Just around the corner from Piccadilly train station, Motel One is a great option for travellers on a budget who don’t want to compromise on style. The German brand offers a winning combination of a straightforward pricing structure, simple rooms with all the essentials, stylish public areas and a central location. A ‘Madchester’/Britpop-themed lounge and bar features a disco ball and guitars on shelves, while rooms are done out simply with white textured walls, floor-to-ceiling windows, modern dark wooden furniture and splashes of colour.


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• A complete guide to the best hotels in Manchester


York

York’s big plus is that it’s easily walkable – no need for taxis, buses or, if you arrive by train, expensive parking. And some of its greatest showpieces are free: the medieval walls with their birds-eye views; the National Railway Museum (check out Queen Victoria’s silk-lined carriage); quirky snickelways (medieval alleys) that lead to hidden courtyards; and the city’s Art Gallery with its national collection of ceramics.

Shambles Market – over 70 independent stall holders – is fun to wander and pick up a picnic; eat in the riverside Museum Gardens or those of the Treasurer’s House with its Minster views. Children aged up to 16 have free entry to the Minster if with an adult, while pre-booked tickets for the scary-but-great-fun York Dungeon are cheaper than buying on the day. If little legs get tired, the city’s open-topped tour bus lets you hop on and off when you want. Staying doesn’t have to be too costly either, with some great budget and boutiquey places to base yourself for under £100 a night. Here’s our guide and hotel picks below.

By Helen Pickles



The Shambles, York


The Shambles in York


Credit: George Clerk www.georgeclerk.com/georgeclerk

Where to stay in York

    

The Bar Convent

York, Yorkshire, England

9
Telegraph expert rating

As part of a still-working convent in a historic building, this is one of Britain’s more unusual guesthouses and a worthy contender for York’s best-value accommodation. It’s just outside the city walls, by the Micklegate Bar entrance, so well-placed for doing York’s sights if you want to avoid the worst of the crowds. Bedrooms are modest yet roomy and well-equipped (the top two were designed by Olga Polizzi), there’s a charming café, fully kitted kitchen for rustling up meals, washing machine, peaceful garden and the city is walkable.


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The Bloomsbury

York, Yorkshire, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

This elegant yet relaxed Victorian terrace house in the suburb of Clifton offers good value, although it’s a 20-minute walk from the city centre. Guests are welcomed with tea and delicious lemon drizzle cake; there’s a fridge with help-yourself water and soft drinks, books and board games to borrow; and the young couple who run the hotel will store bikes and even do washing for no charge. While there’s no lounge, guests are welcome to use the dining room. Breakfast in the charmingly traditional dining-room, with its fresh flowers and crisp cloths, is a delight.


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70

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Guy Fawkes Inn

York, Yorkshire, England

8
Telegraph expert rating

A historic pub-with-rooms, in a plum position by York Minster. Even closer, on the opposite side of the street, is the 16th-century church of St Michael-le-Belfrey where, in 1570, Guy Fawkes was baptised. Step straight into the small bar which, like the snug and dining room, is darkly cosy with stained-wood floors, bitter-chocolate walls, well-worn tables and the odd suit of armour. Wonky stairs lead up to the bedrooms, which feature four-poster beds and a scattering of antiques, and the restaurant offers above-average pub classics.


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From


£
92

per night

Rates provided by
Booking.com

• A complete guide to the best hotels in York

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